How to make Jump Standards

A Pair of Jump Standards are made out of two two-by-fours about eight feet long. After planing them smooth on all sides, measure off two feet from one end of each, and mark off the remaining six feet in inches, as shown in Fig. 259.

Excerpt from the book – THE BOY CRAFTSMAN
Practical and Profitable Ideas for a Boy’s Leisure Hours
BY A. Neely Hall (Published, August, 1905.)

After squaring these divisions across the poles with your try-square, bore holes three-eighths of an inch in diameter through the poles at each division. Then, with a small brush and black paint, mark off each foot with a band extending around the pole, each half foot with a narrower band, and each inch with a short line, as shown in the drawings. Letter the foot divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.

Figs. 259-262.—Details of Jump Standards.

When both standards have been finished, bury them in the ground to a depth of thirteen inches, eight feet apart. Cut two wooden pegs similar to Fig. 261 to fit the holes, and procure a nine-foot pine or hickory pole one inch thick for a cross-bar (see Fig. 260). When the bar is placed upon the pegs, the distance from its top to the ground should correspond with the figure on the upright. If not the same, raise or lower the uprights until the error is corrected.

With a pair of these standards there is no danger of injury by tripping over the bar, as the latter will fall off with the slightest knock. There is one disadvantage in using a stick, however, it being easily broken if jumped upon. Because of this, a rope with a weight attached to each end, as shown in Fig. 262 is often substituted. The ends of the rope are hung over the pegs in such a way that it will slip off the pegs when struck. The weights should be just heavy enough to prevent the rope from sagging in the centre.

Excerpt from the book – THE BOY CRAFTSMAN
Practical and Profitable Ideas for a Boy’s Leisure Hours
BY A. Neely Hall
With more than four hundred illustrations by the author and Norman P. Hall
BOSTON
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.
Published, August, 1905.

Read more

Hard and soft water – How to soften hard wat... Do you live in a place where the water is "hard"? It is easy to tell if you do, because a chalky layer, or scale, will usually build up inside yo...
How to Make a Paper Banger – Art projects fo... To make this harmless and loud toy – the Paper Banger, we need strong sheet of paper size 6,3 x 9,5 inches (16 x 24 cm)  (or other sheet of paper...
How to make a Hygrometer? How to make a Hygrometer? When you're planning a picnic with your friends, you need to know that the weather will be fine so that you can enjoy y...
Make a Rain Gauge – How to Make a Homemade R... Rain GaugeAn accurate rain gauge may be easily constructed from galvanized iron, as shown in the sketch herewith. The funnel, A, overlaps and rests on...
Close Menu