Martin birdhouse plans – How to make a birdhouse out of wood

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Martin birdhouse plans – Part 2

Cut the Gable-Ends M and partition N (Figs. 703 and 704) out of 12-inch boards, making the angle at the peak 90 degrees. Bore three 2 1/2-inch doorways through ends M, in the positions shown. Nail floor boards L to the bottoms of gable-ends M and partition N, then cut partitions 0 (Fig. 704) 4 inches wide, to fit between ends M and partition N, and fasten floor P on top.

Fig. 704. — Detail of Top Section
Fig. 704. — Detail of Top Section

Cut the Roof Boards long enough to project 6 inches over the gable-ends and side walls, fasten them together in two sections with battens, and fasten them to the tops of the gable-ends.

Cut two triangular pieces like 5 (Fig. 705), and nail one to the center of each end of floor L. Prepare a pair of Brackets of the shape of U (Fig. 706) to fit under each of the pieces 5, and sixteen of the same size to fit under the third-story ledge, four on each side of the house. Cut sixteen brackets of the shape of bracket T (Fig. 705), and fasten these below the second-story ledge, four on each side of the house.

Cut The Chimney blocks Q and R of the shape shown in Fig. 707, nail them together, and fasten to the center of the peak of the roof.

Figs. 705 and 706. — Details of Shelf Brackets Fig. 707. — Chimney
Figs. 705 and 706. — Details of Shelf Brackets Fig. 707. — Chimney

The Bird-House Support is built up as shown in Figs. 708 to 710. Center post V is a 2-by-6, pieces W are 2-by-2s (Fig. 709), brackets X are cut out of a 2-by-6 (Fig. 710), and the shoulder blocks Y and Z are cut out of a piece of 2-by-4. You will see by Fig. 709 that one of the triangular brackets X is spiked to each of the edges of the 2-by-6 V, so the tops are on the same level. Shoulder cross-pieces Y are then spiked to upright V and to brackets X, even with the tops of brackets X. Two-by-two W- is spiked to each side of 2-by-6 V, with the top butting against the under side of shoulder crosspiece Y.
Another bracket X is then spiked to each of the pieces Wy with its top even with the tops of the other brackets. Shoulder blocks Z are cut to fit against brackets X and crosspieces Y. Center member V of the support should project far enough above the bracket, so the first-, second-, and third-story frames will slip over it, and the top floor will rest upon it.

A Concrete Base

Because a martin house must have a height of from 15 to 20 feet above the ground, the base of the support must be made very solid to prevent its blowing over in a heavy wind-storm. The best method is to dig a hole about 30 inches deep, 20 inches wide, and 20 inches long, stand the support in the center and fill in around it with concrete.

Figs. 708 to 710. — Details of Post Support for Martin House
Figs. 708 to 710. — Details of Post Support for Martin House

Mix up the concrete in the way described for making the mixture for the concrete lawn-roller (Chapter 34).

To Set Up the Martin House, after the support has been erected, wall require two persons. Build a temporary scaffolding around the support, to stand upon, and raise
and set in place one section of the house at a time. Figures 711 to 714 in the Frontispiece to Part 4, opposite page 293, show how the author rigged up a ladder scaffolding for setting up his martin house; also how the sections were assembled.

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