Airplane Kites – How to Make a Kite By W. A. Reich

After building a number of kites from a recent description in Amateur Mechanics I branched out and constructed the aeroplane kite shown in the illustration, which has excited considerable comment in the neighborhood on account of its appearance and behavior in the air.
Airplane Kites - How to Make a Kite By W. A. Reich - Fig 1
The Kite Being Tailless Rides the Air Waves Like an Aeroplane in a Steady Breeze

The main frame consists of a center-stick, A, 31 in. long, and two cross-sticks, of which one, B, is 31 in. long and the other, C, 15-1/2 in. long. The location of the crosspieces on the centerpiece A is shown in the sketch, the front piece B being 1-3/4 in. from the end, and the rear piece C, 2-1/4 in. from the other end. The ends of the sticks have small notches cut to receive a string, D, which is run around the outside to make the outline of the frame and to brace the parts. Two cross-strings are placed at E and F, 7 in. from either end of the centerpiece A, other brace strings being crossed, as shown at G, and then tied to the cross-string F on both sides, as at H.
Airplane Kites - How to Make a Kite By W. A. Reich - Fig 2
General Plan and Outline of the Kite, Which may be Built in Any Size, If the Proportions are Kept, and Its Appearance in the Air on a Steady Breeze

The long crosspiece B is curved upward to form a bow, the center of which should be 3-1/4 in. above the string by which its ends are tied together. The shorter crosspiece is bent and tied in the same manner to make the curve 2-1/2 in., and the centerpiece to curve 1-3/4 in., both upward.

The front and rear parts, between the end and the cross-strings E and F, are covered with yellow tissue paper, which is pasted to the crosspieces and strings. The small wings L are purple tissue paper, 4 in. wide at M and tapering to a point at N.

The bridle string is attached on the centerpiece A at the junction of the crosspieces B and C, and must be adjusted for the size and weight of the kite. The kite is tailless and requires a steady breeze to make it float in the air currents like an aeroplane.

The bridle string and the bending of the sticks must be adjusted until the desired results are obtained. The bridle string should be tied so that it will about center under the cross-stick B for the best results, but a slight change from this location may be necessary to make the kite ride the air currents properly.

The center of gravity will not be the same in the construction of each kite and the string can be located only by trial, after which it is permanently fastened.

THE BOY MECHANIC – BOOK 2 1000 THINGS FOR BOYS TO DO
HOW TO CONSTRUCT DEVICES FOR WINTER SPORTS, MOTION-PICTURE CAMERA, INDOOR GAMES, REED FURNITURE, ELECTRICAL NOVELTIES, BOATS, FISHING RODS, CAMPS AND CAMP APPLIANCES, KITES AND GLIDERS, PUSHMOBILES, ROLLER COASTER, FERRIS WHEEL AND HUNDREDS OF OTHER THINGS WHICH DELIGHT EVERY BOY WITH 995 ILLUSTRATIONS PUBLISHED 1915, BY H. H. WINDSOR CHICAGO POPULAR MECHANICS CO. PUBLISHERS

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