War Kite – How to Make a Kite By Park Snyder

The material required for the making of a war kite is three pine sticks, each 60 in. long, one stick 54 in. long, one stick 18 in. long, all 1/2 in. square; 4 yd. of cambric; a box of tacks; some linen thread, and 16 ft. of stout twine.

Place two 60-in. sticks parallel with each other and 18 in. apart, then lay the 54-in. piece across at right angles to them 18 in. from the upper ends, as shown in Fig. 1, and fasten the joints with brads.

At a point 21 in. below this crosspiece, attach the 18-in. crosspiece.

The extending ends of all the three long pieces are notched, Fig. 2, and the line is stretched taut around them, as shown by the dotted lines.
War Kite - How to Make a Kite By Park Snyder
The Line should be a Very Strong One, Then Banners can be Flown on It

If the cambric is not of sufficient size to cover the frame, two pieces must be sewed together, then a piece cut out to the shape of the string, allowing 1 in. to project all around for a lap.

The cambric is sewn fast to the string with the linen thread. Fasten the cloth to the frame part with the tacks, spacing them 1 in. apart.

The space in the center, between the sticks, is cut out. Make two pieces of the remaining goods, one 36 in. by 18 in., and the other 36 in. by 21 in.

The remaining 60-in. stick is fastened to these pieces of cambric, as shown in Fig. 3, and the whole is fastened to the main frame so as to make a V-shaped projection. The bridle strings, for giving the proper distribution of pull on the line to the kite, are fastened, one to the upper end of the long stick in the V-shaped piece attached to the kite, and the other to the lower end, as shown in Fig. 4.

The inclination can be varied to suit the builder by changing the point of attachment of the kite line to the bridle. If it is desired to fly the kite directly overhead, attach the line above the regular point and for low flying make the connection below this point.

The regular point is found by trial flights with the line fastened temporarily to the bridle, after which the fastening is made permanent.
War Kite - How to Make a Kite By Park Snyder - diy plan
The Sticks are Fastened Solidly with Brads, and the Cloth Sewed to the String around Their Ends (Fig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3, Fig. 4)

THE BOY MECHANIC РBOOK 2 1000 THINGS FOR BOYS TO DO
HOW TO CONSTRUCT DEVICES FOR WINTER SPORTS, MOTION-PICTURE CAMERA, INDOOR GAMES, REED FURNITURE, ELECTRICAL NOVELTIES, BOATS, FISHING RODS, CAMPS AND CAMP APPLIANCES, KITES AND GLIDERS, PUSHMOBILES, ROLLER COASTER, FERRIS WHEEL AND HUNDREDS OF OTHER THINGS WHICH DELIGHT EVERY BOY WITH 995 ILLUSTRATIONS
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