How to Make a Box Kite

A simple method of constructing a box kite is given in detail as follows:
The sticks should be made of straight grained wood, which may be either spruce, basswood or white pine.

Excerpt from the book: THE BOY MECHANIC VOLUME I 700 THINGS FOR BOYS TO DO WITH 800 ILLUSTRATIONS 1913, BY H. H. WINDSOR CHICAGO POPULAR MECHANICS CO. PUBLISHERS

The longitudinal corner spines, A A, should be 3/8 in. square by 42 in. long, and the four diagonal struts, B, should be 1/4 in. by 1/2 in., and about 26 in. long.

Two cloth bands should be made to the exact dimensions given in the sketch and fastened to the four longitudinal sticks with 1 oz. tacks.

It is well to mark the positions of the sticks on the cloth bands, either with a soft lead-pencil or crayon, in order to have the four sides of each band exactly equal.

How to Make a Box Kite
Detail of Box Kite

The ends of the bands should be lapped over at least 1/2 in. and sewed double to give extra strength, and the edges should be carefully hemmed, making the width, when finished, exactly 12 in.

Probably the best cloth for this purpose is nainsook, although lonsdale cambric or lightweight percaline will answer nearly as well.

The diagonal struts, B, should be cut a little too long, so that they will be slightly bowed when put in position, thus holding the cloth out taut and flat.

They should be tied together at the points of intersection and the ends should be wound with coarse harness maker’s thread, as shown at C, to prevent splitting.

The small guards, D, are nailed or glued to the longitudinal sticks to prevent the struts slipping out of position. Of course the ends of the struts could be fastened to the longitudinal strips if desired, but if made as described the kite may be readily taken apart and rolled up for convenience in carrying.

The bridle knots, E, are shown in detail at H and J. H is a square knot, which may be easily loosened and shifted to a different position on the bridle, thus adjusting the lengths of F and G.

A bowline knot should be tied at J, as shown, to prevent slipping. If the kite is used in a light wind, loosen the square knot and shift nearer to G, thus shortening G and lengthening F, and if a strong wind is blowing, shift toward F, thereby lengthening G and making F shorter.

In a very strong wind do not use the bridle, but fasten a string securely to the stick at K.

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